Monthly Archives: May 2015

THE INSPIRED BY CHELSEA BLOG From “Designer” to “Do-able”

Back from the RHS Chelsea Flower Show I am fired up with inspiration and new ideas.

 

It fascinates me that there is definite “trending” in plants every year and this is very apparent at RHS Chelsea.  This year there were the usual purples, whites and zippy greens, but there were more powerful splashes of colour using Primulas, Geums (Totally Tangerine and Princess Juliana), Irises and Foxtail Lillies.  Grasses had a shout too (especially silver green varieties of Deschampia) and also ferns as foils were back in fashion.  I was drawn to the sinister but beautiful darker ports and burgundies.  There were the usual suspects of Geranium phaeum, Cercium rivulare and red astrantia contrasted with hostas and euphorbias.  But there were some more unusual appearances from the gorgeous Papaver “Blackcurrant Fizz’, some sumptuous burgundy irises and the amazing Angelica sylvestris “Ebony”.

 

Morgan stanley Healthy City Garden

Morgan Stanley Healthy City Garden by Chris Beardshaw

 

This year it was not the planting but the structures, walls and seating that inspired me the most.  It reminded me that good garden design ought to be focused not just around the plants but also on features that contribute aesthetically and functionally.

 

Walls and fences are as important as staging to the cast of plants in the border and nowhere is this more apparent than at Chelsea.  These seemingly impossible and impossibly expensive backdrops need not be reproduced but could be adapted and downscaled to fit in a more modest garden.

 

There is inspiration to be taken by Marcus Barnett’s De Stijl inspired panelling which acts as a backdrop both to the planting and seating.  This could be reproduced using panels on an existing wall, by painting onto a wall, or even just etching black lines on a white concrete wall.

The telegraph Garden by marcuss Barnett

In contrast to the modernity of the De Stijl panels is this simple, rustic wall in the L’Occitane Garden.  I love the contrast and “soft” texture of the wall that makes it a subtle non-intrusive backdrop to the planting.  Again this would be easy to replicate in a quiet corner or along a boundary and would work equally in a town or country garden.

Beautiful textural wall in the  “A perfumers Garden in Grasse by LOccitaine” – Chelsea flower show 2015

This “chimney” caught my eye – I love the use of the wall buttress against the wooden fencing  – the dry-stone brickwork is cleverly repeated in the edging of the gravel path – and it adds height and solidity to the ethereal soft planting below.

 

Royal Bank of Canada Garden by Mathew Wilson

Royal Bank of Canada Garden by Mathew Wilson

In the Viking Ocean Cruise garden most eyes were upon the mirror sculpture.  However look beyond to the purple panelling – this works with the wooden decking – the key is in the symmetry of all the pieces working together.  This could be reproduced with formal planting of box and silver birch in a city garden, or would also work with a cottage garden border.

 

Viking ocean cruises garden

Viking ocean cruises garden

In addition to walls and fencing, most gardens incorporate a seat or seating area.  Again I was inspired by how seating spaces were created as well as the materials and aesthetic design of the seats themselves.  I think the best was seen in the L’Occitane Garden – I loved the deceptive simplicity of the layout of the garden and how the seating seemed casually placed under the shade of the tree, but was actually the focal element of the planting and framed by the walled rill.

 

Secluded seating area in the "A perfumers Garden in Grasse"

Secluded seating area in the “A perfumers Garden in Grasse”

This feature caught my eye and I love its duality.  There is the modern and the traditional – i.e. the concrete on top of the rustic dry stone walling.  There is the dual use of it being a wall and a seat together.  Finally it would work as a standalone feature in the centre of a lawn as well as infront of or behind a border.  Simple but multi-functional.

 

Multi functional bench in the Cloudy Bay Garden by the Rich Brothers

Multi functional bench in the Cloudy Bay Garden by the Rich Brothers

Although we can’t all have the wonderful outdoors room of Adam Frost or the fun and functional glass bubble of the Rich brothers we can always incorporate some design element from RHS Chelsea into our gardens.  We love the “wow” factor plants provide because it’s not permanent – but surely we can incorporate a more permanent “wow” into our gardens with a seat or wall or path?  Or it could be something subtle to compliment the ‘wow” of the our plants.  It is far more do-able than perhaps we think.

Bye for now  – Brett

Next blog “Wonderful waterfalls and water features”

 All photos courtesy of the RHS – check out www.rhs.org.uk/Shows-Events/RHS-Chelsea-Flower-Show for more information and inspiration

HOW TO MAKE THE MOST OF THE RHS SHOWS

It’s beginning – the buzz, the build up …  not the General Election but something of far more interest to gardeners – The RHS Flower Shows.

Although most media coverage is centered on the RHS Chelsea and RHS Hampton Court Flower Shows, there are a range of RHS Shows all over the country that start in February and finish late October.

Show garden at Hampton Court flower show 2014

Show garden at Hampton Court flower show 2014

These are my top tips on how to the make the most of the RHS Shows

  1. Consider all the RHS Shows 

Because of the difference in locations and season – each RHS Show has its own distinct character and thus each one is well worth visiting.  Don’t be disheartened if you missed out on Chelsea this year – I guarantee that you will enjoy and learn just as much ambling around the (often muddy but somehow more “real”) RHS Malvern Autumn Show.

  1. Package them up with other attractions 

Location may seem off-putting – but the advantage about the RHS Shows is that they are held at the same location and (more or less) run on the same dates every year – so it is possible to plan in advance.  For example, if you live miles away from Woking, the trip to the RHS Wisley Flower Show may seem excessive.  But surely it is worth the expense of an over night stay when you have the beautiful garden of William Robinson’s Gravetye Manor only 49 minutes away, with also Sissinghurst and Great Dixter less than an hour and a half away?  That surely must be the gardener’s dream horticultural excursion!

  1. Research 

Your first trip should be to the RHS website.  This lists all the facilities of each RHS Show, will preview the Show Gardens, will list all the exhibitors and will often include a history, interesting facts, photos – in fact you can even pre-buy souvenirs to save queuing on the day.

Show garden at Chelsea 2006

Show garden at Chelsea 2006

  1. Useful Things to Take
  • For some reason it is always cold at an RHS Show – so take an extra layer of clothing and thermal socks.  I went to RHS Chelsea in 2013 and although the weather was glorious, my feet were numb by the end of it.
  • A thermos flask is a great idea to save queuing.  I wouldn’t recommend lugging around an entire picnic but definitely a small thermos flask (which can be refilled).
  • A fully charged mobile phone is invaluable.  I take literally hundreds of photos of plant combinations that I like.  I also take notes on my phone of plant names, nurseries and suppliers – saves the bulk of a camera and notebook and pencil.
  • Binoculars – a small pair are really useful for scrutinizing details

    The crowd in front of our 2012 show garden

    The crowd in front of our 2012 show garden

  1. Talk

Gardeners belong to one of the greatest fraternities on the planet.  We are all in it together – the battle against slugs, the ravages of drought, and the joy of a newly opened peony.  The camaraderie of the punters at the RHS Shows is amazing.  Everyone stands back for one another for photos, there is a silent law about how long one can stand in the front row of a Show Garden, we all want to spot a Gardener’s World presenter, and we disdain the selfie-taker.  So it’s easy to talk.  I learnt more about Antirrhinums talking to a little old lady of eighty in the Floral Marquee than from any book.

If a designer seems approachable, then talk to him or her.  They love hearing feedback and answering questions about their concept.  Obviously don’t ask them about which clematis would they recommend for your garden shed or how do they feel about not getting a Gold Medal, but ask about why they chose certain cultivars, or what inspired their planting combinations.  When I designed my RHS garden for BBC Gardener’s World Live, I loved hearing peoples’ opinions and answering questions.

  1. Know what you want out of it 

Do you want inspiration for a shady corner?  Do you want to know what to plant as a foil for your alliums?  Are you contemplating a pond?  Or do you want to drift around and simply be dazzled and inspired? To get the best of an RHS Show it is very useful to clarify your own gardening objectives beforehand. I always want to see the new plants that are being revealed.

  1. Doom or Bloom?

When I talk to people at the end of an RHS Show I tend to see one of two reactions – either

“OMG I’m such a rubbish gardener.  I’ve just realized how awful I am.”

Or

“OMG I can’t wait to get home and put that combination of the fern, the hosta and the purple thingy together, under that evergreen clematis I saw.”

The most important way of making the most of an RHS Show is to let it inspire you.  Let it excite and motivate you.  For that reason I can’t wait to visit one.  And urge you to do so too.

Bye for now – Brett

P.s. My earlier blog – “Eco-gardens – The Future is Green” talked about greening up front gardens and driveways.  I’m delighted to see that the RHS has launched its 3 year “Greening Grey Britain” Campaign.  Go to www.rhs.org.uk/greeninggreybritain for more information and ideas.