Bee Friendly

With many of our gardens being over groomed and modernised our bees are in decline. The maintenance free minimalistic gardens mean that many of our bees are in trouble. Also, our farmland has lost a lot of its natural variety with large fields being planted with a single crop replacing the smaller wider variety crops and hedgerows that bees need. This has resulted in the extinction of more than 20 varieties of bees. Several other varieties of bees still remain at risk.

With farmers being encouraged to sow their field margins with nectar and pollen rich wild flower mix to create flower rich habitats for bees and other insects as part of The National Pollinator Strategy for further information click here

It makes sense that we should follow suit in our own gardens.By following a few simple steps you can easily make your garden or at least a section of it a more friendly environment for our busy little buzzers.

Go for variety: There are a huge number of bee friendly plants available such as: – holly hocks, honeysuckle, lilac, buddleia, clematis …. there is a huge list! Go for single flower head types of flowers rather than doubles.

Single flower form -good for pollinators

Daisy & butterfly

Double flower form- pollinators cannot get to the nectar

double Peony

Garden centres often have great labels to show which plants are nectar and pollen rich varieties.

Consider your seasons: Like you, bees need food and shelter all year around.  Providing even just one bee house or nesting box is fun and easy to do and will provide winter shelter for hibernating Queen Bees as well as a home in the busy summer months.

Our new bee post prototype soon to be on sale – All the holes were full of solitary bee eggs by the end of last season!

15 10 16- phone pictures 018

Create a meadow: Instead of mowing all of your lawn why not leave an area to grow and form a natural meadow state. Or why not go the whole hog and replace some of your lawn with Wildflower turf for a greater mix of beautiful bee friendly native flowers.

wild flower meadow

Have a conservation section: Section an area of your garden purely for conservation.  Provide planting, water and shelter within this area and watch your wildlife thrive.

Minimise the use of pesticides:  Ideally stop using pesticides or at the very least use less pesticides and allow nature to do its job.

With little effort these beautiful essential buzzy Bees can be given a helping hand.